Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Excerpt 1:Speak No Evil by Tanya Anne Crosby



SPEAK NO EVIL, published by eKensington, is set near Charleston, South Carolina, where Crosby lived for many years and which remains one of her favorite cities.  It's a contemporary story of secrecy, a grand southern family in decline, and of what happens to three sisters when their mother, newspaper heiress  Florence Willodean Aldridge, unexpectedly dies.  Her daughters--Caroline, Augusta and Savannah--return for the funeral, unsurprised that the dark past they share still casts its shadow over them and their legacy.

Florence has left a number of demands, including that the sisters live together in the family home for one year or lose their inheritance, and that Caroline must take over The Tribune.  They've barely settled in when a series of kidnappings and murders resurrects memories of their brother's disappearance as a child.  Amid rising tensions, it soon becomes clear that Caroline, having unwittingly taken a major role in the investigation through The Tribune's coverage, is most likely the killer's next target.

Even as she tamps down her fear and struggles with turmoil at home and at the paper, Caroline must confront her feelings for ex fianc├ę, Jack Shaw, the only man she has ever loved, and perhaps the only person who stands between her and the killer.               
Excerpt from Tanya Anne Crosby's SPEAK NO EVIL...
Together she and Savannah made their way inside, as one by one, neighbors Caroline hadn’t seen in a decade brought sympathy along with their best casseroles. Thanking each for both, she set the food out in the dining room, noting that there was more than enough to feed an army for a year. Maybe they could donate some? She didn’t want it to go to waste and didn’t intend to remain in Charleston beyond the reading of the will. She was pretty sure her sisters had the same idea. Any arrangements that would need to be made could be handled over the phone, via e-mail and fax. That was the beauty of technology.

“My dear,” someone said sympathetically, tapping Caroline’s shoulder as she set a third dish of ambrosia salad on the buffet. Unbelievably, there was no more space on the antique Georgian table, even with its
six feet of extensions.

“Well, hello, Miss Rose!” Caroline exclaimed. “How lovely to see you!” There was no pretense in the greeting. Rose Simmons’s wrinkled face brought back memories of Caroline’s earliest years in this old house, the only good ones she could recall.

“Gracious! I wouldn’t have missed it,” Miss Rose said. “Your mother was a wonderful woman. Such a lovely funeral!” she added with unreserved approval. “I hope my children will pay their respects so beautifully!”

A prick of guilt jabbed Caroline. Everything had been prearranged. It was the one thing she could thank her mother for: Flo wasn’t the sort to leave unfinished business. She skirted the compliment. “Well, I’m
glad you could make it,” she offered with a smile, and then caught a glimpse of the figure standing in the entrance to the dining room and all thoughts flew out of her head at once.

“Oh, before I forget, I brought the greens!” Miss Rose declared. Caroline blinked, her gaze fixed on the man she had nearly married ten years before. “Greens?”

His eyes were as vivid a blue as she recalled, with points of light that dimmed or brightened based on the intensity of his smile. Right now, they were practically electric and Caroline could barely focus.
“I don’t know the Greens, Miss Rose. . . .”


Miss Rose chuckled, gently cuffing Caroline’s forearm. “Well, of course you do! You always asked after them and I remembered and brought them!”

Caroline gave the old woman a confused smile, and noticed Jack was smirking, those lights in his eyes dancing impishly. The familiar, playful grin annoyed her far more than it should have.

Miss Rose clasped a hand to her breast. “Poor sweet dear! It must be the shock,” she declared. “That’s quite understandable.” She patted Caroline’s arm consolingly. “Flo’s death was so unexpected!” She
shook her head. “Your mother will be sorely missed, but it should cheer you to know they are talking about planting a garden in Waterfront Park in her honor. I hope they do!

“The Florence Willodean Aldridge Memorial Garden,” Rose continued, but Caroline was no longer listening. The old woman peered over her shoulder to see what had captured Caroline’s attention and a sudden look of comprehension crossed her features. She smiled knowingly. “Well, goodness! I understand. I shall leave you to your guests, my dear girl. Just make sure you put some of them greens aside for later. I cooked them up just the way you like them, with a nice big ham hock!”

It dawned on Caroline suddenly that the “greens” were not people. Miss Rose had brought mustard greens. And truthfully, she hated them intensely but vaguely recalled being five at Miss Rose’s daughter’s baptism celebration and feeling incredibly guilty about wanting to spit them out. With a quelling look from her mother, she had reluctantly swallowed them and complimented Miss Rose’s greens emphatically—obviously, much too emphatically.

Miss Rose clucked at her, shaking an admonishing finger. “You always were too thin!”

Caroline’s cheeks heated as her mother’s neighbor ambled away, leaving her completely at Jack’s mercy.

The old woman gave Jack a nod on her way out of the dining room and said pleasantly, “Afternoon, Jack.”

Jack greeted her with a smile and a nod. “Afternoon, Miss Rose. You look lovely as ever.”

Miss Rose ducked her head shyly and giggled like a schoolgirl. The instant she was out of earshot, Jack turned the full impact of hisroguish smile on Caroline. “Just make sure you put some of them greens aside for later,” he teased, stirring from the doorframe and strolling into the room with a languor that was both infuriating and
reassuring in its familiarity.

“I guess your mother never taught you not to eavesdrop,” Caroline said, hating herself for giving in to feelings of resentment.

The twinkles in his eyes vanished. “We both know my mother didn’t teach me much of anything, Caroline.”

He said it calmly, congenially, but Caroline knew she’d hit a nerve. For a long awkward moment, they stood facing one another, neither quite certain what to say. The scent of wilting magnolias drifted
between them. Ten years ago, her mother had ordered the flowers as centerpieces for the tables at their wedding. Now, they adorned every corner of the house and Caroline would forever associate the scent with death and sorrow.

 Fitting, somehow.

Jack had the decency to look uncomfortable. Hands in his pockets, he peered down at the floor. “We still need to talk to Sadie,” he offered. “Finalize the report.”

“Well, I’m sure you’ll find her in the kitchen.”

It was Sadie, their mother’s housekeeper, who had discovered Flo sprawled at the foot of the stairs. Doped out on clonazepam, Flo had apparently tripped over a loose board at the top of the stairs.

“It’s just a formality,” he assured. “It can wait.”

She’d rather believe he was here because he was doing his duty for work, not because of some misplaced sense of obligation to their past. “So you’re working?”

“I came to pay my respects, not upset you. Sorry, Caroline.”

At one time, Caroline couldn’t have imagined anyone else she’d rather be comforted by. Now she didn’t even know how to talk to him. “Thanks for coming, Jack.”
He took a step backward. “You’re more like her than you realize,” he said quietly, removing his hands from his pockets. He hesitated, clearly wanting to say more. Instead, he turned and left.

Ignoring the surreptitious glances from their guests, Caroline turned her back on him. Trying hard to be casual, she stabbed a silver spoon into a dish before following Jack out into the hall to watch his
retreat.

He edged his way through the crowd, somehow avoiding human contact despite the breadth of his shoulders. He never once looked back. Without a word, he opened the front door, stepped out into the afternoon light and closed it quietly behind him.

Caroline choked on a wave of emotion. “Shit,” she said softly.

Savannah appeared behind her. “That bad?”

Caroline blinked away tears. “He said he was looking for Sadie.”

Savannah lifted a brow. “Well, I doubt that’s why he came by here today.”

“The past doesn’t change just because he wants it to!” Caroline said emphatically and Savannah nodded, wisely recognizing the end of her patience on the subject of Jack Shaw.

©Tanya Anne Crosby 2013


About the Author
Tanya Anne Crosby is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of seventeen romances. Her new novel, SPEAK NO EVIL, is her first romantic suspense novel and her first ebook original.  Her first novel, the historical romance Angel of Fire, was published in 1992 by Avon Books, where she was hailed as "one of Avon's fastest rising stars." Soon after, her book Once Upon a Kiss launched the company's Avon Romantic Treasure imprint.

Known for stories charged with emotion and humor, and filled with flawed characters, Crosby has been honored as a five-time nominee for a Romantic Times Career Achievement Award and nominated for Best Innovative Historical in 1998 and Best Historical Love and Laughter in 1999. Other nominations include multiple Historical Romance of the Year nominations, Best All-Around Historical and Best Historical Mystery.

Now back from a ten year writing hiatus, Tanya has just finished her second romantic suspense novel, which includes several characters from SPEAK NO EVIL.  She lives in Michigan with her husband and two cats and frequently visits family in her beloved Charleston.
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4 comments:

  1. Hi, I really enjoyed the review and excerpt. Funny about the Greens. LOL

    Thanks,
    Mary Hill

    Visit my blog if you get the chance. Would love feedback.

    http://mary-anderingcreatively.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  2. Such a neat cover. I love when cover art is dark and more grunge like. I find that most of my books on my shelf are very dark because that's what I'm drawn too. lol

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very vivid characters in the excerpt. :-)

    Anna @ http://emaginette.wordpress.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yup, I'll be letting Cutie's grandmother know about this book asap. This time I may have to let her borrow it after I read it. ;)

    ReplyDelete

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